Select Page

MNI KI WAKAN: WORLD INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DECADE OF WATER SUMMIT BUILDS A MOVMENT: “What seed might we plant together today that could make the most difference to the future of the Indigenous Peoples’ Water Summit?” 26-year-old Thorne LaPointe asked a group of about 50 Indigenous youth, elders, and non-Indigenous supporters at the inaugural Mni Ki Wakan: World Indigenous Peoples’ Decade of Water Summit. The discussion question, posed on the third day of the summit, was emblematic of the tone, structure, and values that guided the entire event. The Mni Ki Wakan, “Water is Sacred” in the Lakota language, Summit was held on July 31- August 2, 2017, in Minneapolis, MN. The international event marked an exploratory first step upon a 10-year journey toward realizing an Indigenous-led, ecologically sustainable future of restoring clean and healthy water. Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples, primarily youth, collectively began the interactive process of visioning and designing a Mni Ki Wakan World Water Agenda, laying out transformative possibilities to work towards in the coming years.

Read More…

Related News: Turkey Crackdown Chronicle… Read More…

MNI KI WAKAN: WORLD INDIGENOUS PEOPLES’ DECADE OF WATER SUMMIT BUILDS A MOVMENT: “What seed might we plant together today that could make the most difference to the future of the Indigenous Peoples’ Water Summit?” 26-year-old Thorne LaPointe asked a group of about 50 Indigenous youth, elders, and non-Indigenous supporters at the inaugural Mni Ki Wakan: World Indigenous Peoples’ Decade of Water Summit. The discussion question, posed on the third day of the summit, was emblematic of the tone, structure, and values that guided the entire event. The Mni Ki Wakan, “Water is Sacred” in the Lakota language, Summit was held on July 31- August 2, 2017, in Minneapolis, MN. The international event marked an exploratory first step upon a 10-year journey toward realizing an Indigenous-led, ecologically sustainable future of restoring clean and healthy water. Indigenous and non-Indigenous Peoples, primarily youth, collectively began the interactive process of visioning and designing a Mni Ki Wakan World Water Agenda, laying out transformative possibilities to work towards in the coming years.