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Quick and Strong Justice? Not at Gitmo: Earlier this afternoon, President Trump spoke about last night’s terror attack in New York City. He said that he wanted the alleged attacker, a 29-year-old from Uzbekistan, to face “quick justice” and “strong justice.”

We couldn’t agree more.

However, following his remarks, a reporter asked the president if he wanted the “assailant from New York sent to Gitmo.” Trump responded, “I would certainly consider that, yes…send him to Gitmo.” He also said that the attacker should face justice “much quicker and much stronger than we have right now. Because what we have right now is a joke, and it’s a laughingstock.”

Now we’re confused.

If Trump’s aim is truly for quick and strong justice, then the detention facility and military commissions at Guantanamo Bay are the absolute last place this man should be held or face trial. Trump complained that these cases can “go through court for years” and then “who knows what happens.” This is precisely what we’ve been saying about the military commissions for as long as we can remember.

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Quick and Strong Justice? Not at Gitmo: Earlier this afternoon, President Trump spoke about last night’s terror attack in New York City. He said that he wanted the alleged attacker, a 29-year-old from Uzbekistan, to face “quick justice” and “strong justice.”We couldn’t agree more.However, following his remarks, a reporter asked the president if he wanted the “assailant from New York sent to Gitmo.” Trump responded, “I would certainly consider that, yes…send him to Gitmo.” He also said that the attacker should face justice “much quicker and much stronger than we have right now. Because what we have right now is a joke, and it’s a laughingstock.”Now we’re confused.If Trump’s aim is truly for quick and strong justice, then the detention facility and military commissions at Guantanamo Bay are the absolute last place this man should be held or face trial. Trump complained that these cases can “go through court for years” and then “who knows what happens.” This is precisely what we’ve been saying about the military commissions for as long as we can remember.