Select Page

Muslim prisoner of conscience tortured: Russian prisoner of conscience Yevgeny Kim, who was jailed on 19 June for three years and nine months for meeting to study Muslim theologian Said Nursi’s works, was tortured in pre-trial detention. No arrest or trials appear to have taken place of those responsible (see below).

There is a pattern within Russia’s prisons of localised violations of prisoners’ freedom of religion and belief within overall harsh prison conditions nationwide. This pattern – which can include denying access to religious literature – affects among others Muslims in Krasnoyarsk, and a Jehovah’s Witness in Oryol (see below).

Since 2007, both Jehovah’s Witnesses and Muslims who study the works of late Turkish theologian Said Nursi have been particularly targeted by the authorities. A verdict appears to be imminent in Dagestan in the case of three Muslims accused of organising meetings of Muslims to read the works of Nursi, with prosecutors seeking up to five years’ imprisonment (see below).

The pre-trial detention of another Muslim in Dagestan being held for studying theologian Nursi’s works has been extended again until late December (see below).

Prosecutors in Novosibirsk have formally charged three Muslims who read Nursi’s works and who have been under investigation for nearly two years. One Muslim commented that they are “so tired of this stupidity of the law enforcement system” (see below)

In Oryol, a Danish Jehovah’s Witness remains in pre-trial detention. In Kabardino-Balkariya the trial of a Jehovah’s Witness former community leader continues, while another former community leader remains under investigation (see below). In April, Jehovah’s Witnesses were banned nationwide.

Read More…

Related News: Take Action: Tell Congressional Leaders It’s Time to Prevent a Wider Crisis in Congo. Read More…

Muslim prisoner of conscience tortured: Russian prisoner of conscience Yevgeny Kim, who was jailed on 19 June for three years and nine months for meeting to study Muslim theologian Said Nursi’s works, was tortured in pre-trial detention. No arrest or trials appear to have taken place of those responsible (see below).There is a pattern within Russia’s prisons of localised violations of prisoners’ freedom of religion and belief within overall harsh prison conditions nationwide. This pattern – which can include denying access to religious literature – affects among others Muslims in Krasnoyarsk, and a Jehovah’s Witness in Oryol (see below).Since 2007, both Jehovah’s Witnesses and Muslims who study the works of late Turkish theologian Said Nursi have been particularly targeted by the authorities. A verdict appears to be imminent in Dagestan in the case of three Muslims accused of organising meetings of Muslims to read the works of Nursi, with prosecutors seeking up to five years’ imprisonment (see below).The pre-trial detention of another Muslim in Dagestan being held for studying theologian Nursi’s works has been extended again until late December (see below).